Fashion, Jewellery & Textile Design

Developing a discourse in fashion design: What is research for fashion design?

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Fashion, Jewellery & Textile Design

The concept of fashion has attracted a great deal of interest from a variety of academic disciplines such as history, culture, anthropology, sociology, psychology and semiotics to name a few. This has often resulted in tension between different approaches. At a conference held in England in 2009 concerning the future of fashion studies, a number of fashion scholars such Rebecca Arnold, Christopher Breward, Professor Stella Bruzzi and many others, deliberated on the methodologies and research agendas that have emerged in the growing research area of fashion studies.

Mapping A Relevant Education And Training Framework For The Jewellery Sector

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Fashion, Jewellery & Textile Design

This paper acknowledges the ongoing process being used in the Jewellery sector to develop an integrated training and development framework. The framework progresses from ABET Level 1 to doctoral qualifications and shows how the various qualifications could link directly to specific occupations within a sector. In doing so, this paper addresses the boundaries between education, training, industry and government. More importantly, it indicates the inclusive process followed to open the gates to enter the new terrain of relevant education and training for sector specific occupations.

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how the South African jewellery sector is aligning education and training within the government’s educational policy.

An Evaluation Of Interpreted Technical and Aesthetical Design Suitability in Garments

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Fashion, Jewellery & Textile Design

Silk is a prestigious material, often used to produce textiles and clothing associated with rank, luxury, wealth and social status. In Africa silk is produced and used less extensively than cotton and wool – both geographically and socially. However, silk textile traditions in Africa have been sustained by the continuing demand for prestigious culturally significant clothes.

Kalahari tussah silk comes from a silk worm from the Kalahari, a vast region of red sandy soil extending across much of Southern Africa. The wild silk is a naturally occurring renewable resource used by the San, who are the original and oldest inhabitants of South- Africa. Small communities are located in a few areas like the Kalahari Desert region, and regions of Namibia (Lewis- Williams, 1991:6-11).

The role of ergonomics in the clothing industry with specific reference to clothing machinists

Author
Ramdass, Kem

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Fashion, Jewellery & Textile Design

Clothing manufacture is labour-intensive with repetitive andd skilled manipulation of fabric. Poorly-designed workstations contribute to cumulative trauma disorders (CTD) such as musculoskeletal disorders of the neck, shoulder and upper limb, collectively known as repetitive strain injuries (RSI).

Ergonomics, which can be used beneficially in the clothing industry, can be described as a system of interaction between components in the workplace, which include the worker, the work environment both physical and organisational, the task and the workspace. Effective ergonomic interventions could reduce health problems and accidents in the workplace.

The dilemma of technology acceptance from industrially developed countries to new emerging economies

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Fashion, Jewellery & Textile Design

Industries from developed countries tend to overlook the fact that people in new emerging economies are different in terms of context, ergonomics, social and cultural dimensions. Evidence from the literature shows technical design problems involved in adapting technology and that it may require the development of new ergonomics principles because of the diverse nature of people. Users around the world are no longer willing to settle for one-size-fits-all products with standardised technology.

Pedagogical approaches to learning and curriculum development in Design for inclusion and self-reality

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Fashion, Jewellery & Textile Design

The study investigates appropriate approaches to new curriculum development and educational practice at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT).This is necessary in order to ensure success of the multi-cultural student body and facilitate the creation of ethical and culturally unique design solutions by the Bachelors of Technology (BTech) Fashion and Surface Design learners at CPUT.

By using the research dissertations and studio work of six learners as examples, possibilities of best practice and challenges with regard to this diverse context are highlighted, as the success of these learners in the 2006 BTech programme is analysed in a qualitative manner.

How green is your wardrobe?

Author
Smal, Desiree

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Fashion, Jewellery & Textile Design

From the Grave to the Cradle: The Eco-Design Case for the Re-Evaluation of Hemp

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Fashion, Jewellery & Textile Design

This paper argues that the story of hemp is one of mistaken identity and focuses on the potential of hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) in a social and economic context and how it can help to develop with modern technology into ‘new’ materials on a national level with reference to examples from abroad.

Design opportunity mapping for the small scale sector - bringing real life scenario into classroom

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Fashion, Jewellery & Textile Design

Full Title: Design opportunity mapping for the small scale sector - bringing real life scenario into classroom education

Although the semi organized sector consisting of a large number of small scale industries and craft clusters in India together comprise a huge section in terms of both human resource and economy, it has been largely neglected. They face typical issues and problems not traditionally dealt with by industrial designers.

Design Education for Crafts Communities: a Global - Local Approach

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Fashion, Jewellery & Textile Design

Craftspeople still practice crafts as a live tradition and/or as an economic activity. Crafts in India has been continue to contribute to design education in numerous ways. In fact, the very approach to design education in India was laid on the foundations of crafts practices in the country.

Conformity & Creativity: tensions in portfolio requirements

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Fashion, Jewellery & Textile Design

This paper investigates how prospective fashion design students at a University of Technology are required to reflect an understanding of the process of design and the process of construction in their sketches, which are a component of the portfolio they submit for evaluation. I begin by outlining how the portfolio guidelines initiate the anomaly between two desired requirements of novelty and originality / creativity versus the technical / conformity. I reveal how the portfolio requirements encourage students to conform from the onset and argue that this is because the fashion design program continues to train undergraduates to service a traditional and conservative mass market.

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